Deadline for accepting Secondary offers - 15th March

Wandsworth sent out their offer letters to arrive on 1st March, if you applied online you should have also received an email confirming your place.

Congratulations to all those who recieved a place at Ark Putney, we can't wait to meet you!

All secondary offers must be accepted through the Borough of Wandsworth, if you applied online you can do so through the eadmissions website: https://www.eadmissions.org.uk/eAdmissions/app

If you missed out on a place at Ark Putney, never fear! We still have places available on our waiting list, please visit our admissions page to find out about your next steps and starting the appeals process.

If you weren't able to attend our open events or perhaps just need a reminder we would be happy to offer you a tour of the school just telelphone us on 0208 788 3421 or email our Vice Principal Jackie White on j.white@arkputneyacademy.org.

If you would like any help or require more information please email Jackie White.

Assessment

New GCSE headline figures and grades

Videos to help understand the changes

Progress 8 DFE                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IAEgFMSGDY

Progress 8 AQA                 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joZBuypG-JY

Attainment 8                     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWAV1WUbsLo

New grading                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8wAGOCLJ1E

New changes to GCSE    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0dkQqKKfeg

Introduction

The way that a school will be judged in the league tables from 2016 onwards has now changed. Rather than focusing on the percentage of students that achieve 5A*-C grades including a pass in English and Maths, schools will be judged on five new measures.

  • Progress 8
  • Attainment 8
  • % pass in English and Maths combined
  • % achieving a pass in the EBacc
  • Destination data

In addition, from 2016 onwards, subjects will be graded using a new system. English and Maths will use this system for their year 10 students from September 2015. Other subjects will follow suit in September 2016.

The aim of this document is to simplify the changes so that teachers, students and parents can start to feel confident about how the school and the students will be assessed.

New headline measures – Below is an explanation of the 5 new measures.

1.Attainment 8

The Attainment 8  grade is the total number of points a student achieves in their main 8 GCSE qualifications. Now let us discuss what this means.

The Main 8 GCSE Qualifications

Only certain combinations of subjects are included in the Attainment 8 measure. If a student chooses a combination that does not fit within the Attainment 8 grouping, then they will lose a considerable number of points.

The subject groupings are split into 4 pots or buckets

  • English – this pot is worth double points – only if a student takes Language and Literature.
  • Maths – this pot is also worth double points
  • EBacc qualifications – you must have 3 in this grouping
  • Other qualifications – the other subjects will go in here

 

  • English Pot
    • A student must complete two English GCSEs
    • This can be either English language or English literature
    • The higher English GCSE grade will go into the ENGLISH POT and will be worth double points
    • The other English grade can go into pots 6,7 or 8 in the Other qualification pot
  • Maths Pot
    • A student must complete a GCSE in Maths
    • This will go in the MATHS pot and will be worth double points
  • EBacc Pots
    • A student needs to complete at least 3 GCSEs in the EBacc subjects.
    • These are:
      • Science – each science GCSE is worth one pot
        • Double Award Science – two pots
        • Biology, Chemistry and Physics – three pots
      • Geography – worth one pot
      • History – worth one pot
      • French – worth one pot
      • Spanish – worth one pot
      • German – worth one pot
      • Computer science – worth one pot
        • If a student has more than three EBacc subjects, the other grades can go in the “Other qualification” pots.
  • Other qualification pots
    • Three GCSE qualifications will fill the “Other qualification” pots.
    • These will be:
      • Another English GCSE if sat
      • Any other EBacc subjects if the three EBacc pots have been taken up
      • All other GCSE qualifcations
        • Art
        • Product design
        • Catering
        • Music
        • Drama
        • Media studies
        • P.E
      • Maximum of two BTECs
Let’s look at an example

Craig is studying the following GCSEs

English language, English literature, Maths, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, German, Geography and Product Design.

This would be his pot allocation

  • English pot = English language or literature depending on which one is higher
  • Maths pot = Maths
  • EBacc pots = The three highest grades from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Geography and German
  • Other pots = The three highest from English literature/language, Product design and whatever two subjects were not used in the EBacc pots.

Laura is studying the following GCSEs

English language, English literature, Maths, Core Science, Media studies, Sport BTEC, Business BTEC and Art.

This would be her pot allocation

  • English pot = English language or literature depending on which one is higher
  • Maths pot = Maths
  • EBacc pots =Core science and two empty pots
  • Other pots = The three highest grades from her other English, Media studies, Business BTEC, Sport BTEC and Art.

Two of Laura’s GCSE grades would not count towards her “Main 8 GCSE qualications.”

Now let us look at how this affects the Attainment 8 score

Craig’s GCSEs

If you divide the Attainment 8 score  by 10 ( the 8 pots and the fact that English and Maths are double weighted) you will get an average GCSE score for the main 8 subjects.

Craig’s average GCSE score = 73/10 = 7.3. This would equate to a low A.

Laura’s GCSEs

Laura’s average GCSE score = 53/10 = 5.3. This would equate to a low C.               

As you can see, Laura’s attainment 8 score was severely affected by the fact that she did not fill all the necessary pots.

This will have a huge impact on the choices that student can make for their GCSE subjects.

Last year Ark Putney Academy had an Attainment 8 score of 47, equating to an average GCSE score of 4.7 or a low C. This puts APA above the National average.

 

Check out this video - http://www.aqa.org.uk/about-us/supporting-education/policy/gcse-and-a-level-changes/changes-explained

 

2.Progress 8 - the main headline measure

 

In brief Progress 8 will measure how well, on average, a student does in their GCSE grades compared to the grade that they entered secondary school with.

At the end of primary school, students sit their KS2 English and Maths tests. A student will be given an English and a Maths KS2 level. This level is used to create target grades for all subjects that a student studies at GCSE level.

A student will be also awarded an average KS2 level based upon the KS2 English and Maths tests. From this average KS2 level, a prediction will be made as to what a student should achieve at the end of KS4 (GCSE). This will be the Attainment 8 prediction.

We have looked at Attainment 8 already and this is how it impacts the Progress 8 measure.

Each student will have an Attainment 8 grade based on their GCSE results and an Attainment 8 prediction based on their KS2 results.

To work out an individual’s Progress 8 score you would do the following:

Attainment 8 GCSE grade  - Attainment 8 prediction based on KS2

This value would then be divided by 10 (the 8 subjects including double weighted English and Maths)

Now let’s have a look at Laura and Craig again.

Name

KS2 level

Attainment 8 prediction based on KS2 level

Attainment 8 GCSE score

Attainment 8 GCSE – Attainment 8 prediction

Progress 8 score

Craig

5b

69.72

73

3.28

0.328

Laura

3a

33.02

53

19.98

1.998

 

So although Laura had a lower Attainment 8 score, she has made far more progress than Craig across all of her subjects.

A school will be judged on the average Progress 8 score across the entire cohort.

In the cohort above, the average Progress 8 score would be 1.163.

A school should aim to get a Progress 8 score of above 0.

If a school scores a Progress 8 score of -0.5, they will be below the floor standard.

If a school scores a Progress 8 score of +1 or above, they will be exempt from routine inspections by Ofsted because they will be considered to be adding so much value.

Last year, the estimated Ark Putney Academy Progress 8 score was +0.6.

 

Check out this video - http://www.aqa.org.uk/about-us/supporting-education/policy/gcse-and-a-level-changes/changes-explained

 

3.English and Maths GCSE grade

The third headline measure that a school will be judged on will be the percentage of students achieving at least a grade 4 (previously a C grade)  in English (either language or literature) and Maths.

                This would have benefitted APA in 2014-2015 as 65% of students achieved A*-C in English language where as 80% of students achieved A*-C in English literature.

In 2014-2015, 58% of students achieved at least a C grade in English language and Maths. If the English literature grade was used instead, the result would have been 72%.

 

4.EBacc Measure

The fourth headline measure that a school will be judged on will be based around the success of students in the EBacc subjects.

A reminder of the EBacc subjects

  • English
  • Maths
  • Sciences
  • Geography
  • History
  • Modern Foreign Languages

The EBacc result for last year was 27%. The current year 11 EBacc target is 60%.

 

A school will be judged on the percentage of students who have successfully accomplished the EBacc qualification. In order to achieve the EBacc qualification you would need an A*-C in;

  • English
  • Maths
  • Two sciences
  • A humanities (history or geography)
  • A language

5.Student destination

The final measure in which a school will be judged will be based around the school’s ability to retain students into Sixth form education or further education.

New GCSE grades

From September 2015, the GCSE grades awarded to students will start to change.

Students starting year 10 in English and Maths in September 2015 will be the first to experience these changes.

From September 2016, most other subjects will follow the new GCSE grading system.

The GCSE grading will change from A*-U to a new number system.

Here is how it compares

The aim is to show greater differentiation between the students who achieve higher outcomes.

There will still be the same percentage of students achieving a 7, 8 or 9 as there were achieving an A or A*.

The new benchmark figure will change from being a C grade to being a 5, raising expectations.

http://upload.reactcdn.co.uk/harris_secondary_crystalpalace/uploads/asset_image/2_3742.jpgRoughly the same percentage of students will achieve a grade 4 or above that achieved a C or above in the old GCSE grades.

GCSE 9-U

GCSE 9-U (inc +/-)

GCSE A*-U Equivalent

9

9+

A*1

9

A*1/A*2

9-

A*2

8

8+

A*3

8

A*3/A1

8-

A1

7

7+

A2

7

A2/A3

7-

A3

6

6+

B1

6

B1/B2

6-

B2

5

5+

B3

5

B3/C1

5-

C1

4

4+

C2

4

C2/C3

4-

C3

3

3+

D1

3

D2/D3

3-

E1

2

2+

E2

2

E3/F1

2-

F2

1

1+

F3

1

G1/G2

1-

G3

U

U

U

Check out this video -  http://www.aqa.org.uk/about-us/supporting-education/policy/gcse-and-a-level-changes/changes-explained

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changes to KS2 and KS3 and how this will impact the new GCSE grades

From September 2016, there will be huge changes to the way that we assess students during KS3. There will also be changes to how students are assessed at the end of their primary education.

The aim of this document is to summarise these changes and make proposals as to how we deal with them.

 

KS2 changes

At present, students are assessed at the end of KS2 (y6) in English (reading and writing) and Maths.

Students are awarded a level for English and Maths. This level is used to predict a student’s target grade at the end of KS4 – their GCSE grade- as well as being used to calculate targets throughout secondary school.

Nationally students are expected to make at least three levels of progress from KS2 to KS4 but at Ark we set aspirational targets, aiming closer to four levels of progress.

This is shown below

http://www.parentsofblackukpupils.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/GCSE-Grades.jpg

However, there are changes to the way that students will be assessed at the end of KS2. Rather than students taking SATs, they will sit national, standardised tests in English reading and writing and in Maths. As a result of a student’s performance in these tests, they will receive a score between 1 and 100.

At present, as no student has sat these tests, we do not know what a 1 or a 100 equates to. It will be a national standard so the very best student will gain a 100 and the very worst a 1 with all other students fitted in between 1-100 using a normal distribution.

 

 

Impact on the new GCSE grades

All current KS2 and KS3 students will receive their GCSE grades when they finish KS4 using the new GCSE grades (9-1) rather than A*-U.

Although we do not know how the new 1-100 scale equates to a GCSE grade, we can use the old KS2 levels to demonstrate what progress should look like.

KS2

GCSE Equivalent target

6c+

9

5a

8

5b

7

5c

6

4a

5

4b

4

4c

3

3a/3b

2

3c-

1

New KS3 Assessment and grading

As well as changes to KS2 grades and KS4 GCSE grades, levels will be disappearing from KS3. This leaves us with a dilemma as to how we assess and monitor students in KS3.

The proposal from Ark is to use Assessment plus across all subjects. Ark would then be able to provide standardised, network wide assessments that have been moderated and graded at a particular level. The other benefit would be that work could be moderated across the network.

This is how the grading would work

A student would come to secondary school with their KS2 grade (1-100).

KS2

GCSE Equivalent target

6c+

9

5a

8

5b

7

5c

6

4a

5

4b

4

4c

3

3a/3b

2

3c-

1

This would be converted to a new GCSE grade.

A student would then be targeted to achieve that GCSE grade +1 grade at the end of KS3. That would be an aspirational target.

In reality, the aim is for a student to achieve their baseline GCSE grade every year.

For example

If Josh finished KS2 with a level 5c, he would have a baseline GCSE grade of 6.

In year 7, he would need to achieve a grade 6.

In year 8, he would need to achieve a grade 6.

In year 9, he would need to achieve a grade 6. Aspirationally he should achieve a grade 7.

It is an age related grade. The grade 6 in year 7 is different to the grade 6 in year 8.

 

The issue

What does a grade 6 look like in year 7? What does a grade 6 look like in year 8? What does a grade 6 look like in English in year 8? What does a grade look like in Art in year 9?

Ark are currently working with various schools to put together moderated work for each grade at each year so teachers can get an idea of how the grading works.

The English and Maths moderating has been completed and it has been compared to and verified by standardised GL tests.

 

Assessment Guidelines for students

3 1 Controlled assessments.pdf

3 2 Coursework assessments.pdf

3 3 On screen tests.pdf

3 4 Privacy Notice.pdf

3 5 Social media.pdf

3 6 Written examinations.pdf

Information for Parents and students.doc