English

Teaching British Values through English

We seek to promote British values and culture through our study of both literary and non-fiction texts, which provides students with the opportunity to engage in topical issues and learn about different people, places and cultures through discussion and debate which promotes understanding and tolerance.

English at Key Stage 3

The English department at ARK Putney Academy prides itself on its creativity and passion, and seeks through a combination of excellent teaching and rigorous assessment to challenge and inspire our students. At Key Stage 3, we prepare students for the skills that they will need later in life, not only in their GCSEs but also in their lives after ARK Putney. We are always looking to prepare our students for the next challenge, and believe that it is never too early to be thinking about how we are preparing them for the challenge of A Levels and University. Our curriculum reflects this, and we think that the best way of readying our students for the difficulties of further education, is through the teaching of high quality Literature prose, plays and poetry. We teach a broad variety of modern and historical texts, with the intention of giving students a wide range of experience and understanding, and broadening their horizons as much as possible. Our Key Stage 3 curriculum is engaging, fresh, and current, and our philosophy is that all students can achieve when they are motivated and inspired through their learning and their teachers. We believe that the key to success in education is to instil drive and commitment within our students, and we do this by ensuring that our schemes of work and lesson planning engage the students in a variety of different activities and learning styles, and challenge and extend their understanding of the texts.

We seek to promote British values and culture through our study of both literary and non-fiction texts, which provides students with the opportunity to engage in topical issues and learn about different people, places and cultures through discussion and debate which promotes understanding and tolerance.

Year 7

Students begin key stage 3 with the study of The Midnight Zoo and descriptive writing. In the spring term students move on to the study of Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream and poetry. Students end the year with Oliver Twist and 19th Century non-fiction texts. Through formative assessments every 2 weeks we ensure that students are developing the knowledge and skills taught as part of the unit, whilst our three main summative assessments assessing reading and writing track the progress made by students over time.

Year 8

Students begin year 8 with the study of Sherlock Holmes and descriptive writing. In the spring term students move on to the study of The Tempest and poetry. Students end the year with the study of Lord of the Files and 19th and 20th century fiction. Through formative assessments every 2 weeks we ensure that students are developing the knowledge and skills taught as part of the unit, whilst our three main summative assessments assessing reading and writing track the progress made by students over time.

Year 9

The English curriculum in Year 9 seeks to introduce students to the assessment style questions and knowledge and skills required for GCSE. Students begin year 9 with the study of, Of Mice and Men and descriptive writing. In the spring term students move on to the study of Romeo & Juliet and poetry. Students end the year with the study of Life of Pi and an exploration of a range of non-fiction texts. Through formative assessments every 2 weeks we ensure that students are developing the knowledge and skills taught as part of the unit, whilst our three main summative assessments assessing reading and writing track the progress made by students over time.

English at Key Stage 4

In year 10, students begin their GCSE English course and in their English lessons they are prepared for both GCSE English Language and English Literature. Many of the skills needed to complete these papers are very similar, hence they are taught both subjects alongside one another.  Students will complete two exams in each subject at the end of the two year course, and there is no coursework during the two years.

In English, students will be exposed to a variety of texts, and will read great works of English Literature.  They will read extracts from novels from our literary heritage, as well as studying whole plays and texts.  Students will give presentations on ideas and concepts in the texts, and will increase their knowledge of the contexts the works were written in through research and independent study. They will be expected to understand how authors craft their works, and to develop a thorough understanding of techniques used by writers, and of language structure and form.

There is a creative element to English Language, and over the two years students will develop the writing skills that they have begun to work on at Key Stage 3, and will consolidate and improve their creative responses.  They will also learn to write for different audiences and purposes, and develop an understanding of text types. 

We seek to promote British values and culture through our study of both literary and non-fiction texts, which provides students with the opportunity to engage in topical issues and learn about different people, places and cultures through discussion and debate which promotes understanding and tolerance.

Year 10 English Language

English Language contains many similar skills to English Literature.  Students are expected to have read widely, and the more they read outside of school, the better prepared they will be for the exam.  There are two English Language exams and both contain unseen texts.  In English lessons, students will be prepared for working with an unseen text, analysing the language used, commenting on how writers have structured texts, identifying and inferring meanings from the text, and forming their own arguments.  They will have to compare texts that they are shown, summarise key information, and use the information given to form a creative response in a specified form such as a letter or an article.  Students will also learn how to create beautiful descriptive and informative writing, and will learn how to use punctuation and grammar for effect in their writing. 

In Year 10, students will work on skills needed for AQA Paper 1, and through their study of Literature, will be taught the necessary skills needed to answer this paper.  These include skills to analyse language and structure in a text, and the skills of developing a clear line of thought and a clear argument.  Students will complete mock exams throughout the year which will enable them to be completely prepared for Year 11.

Year 10 English Literature 

In English Literature students study a range of texts, both modern and older.  They will study the 19th Century text, Sherlock Holmes’s ‘The Sign of the Four’, and will additionally study Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and a range of poems.  English Literature lessons focus on the context of the novels and plays, and on the writer’s craft.  We explore the language used to create specific effects, and discuss, and write about character motivations, plot structure and the overall effect of a text on a reader or audience.

Year 11 English Language

Year 11 is about finessing the skills needed for English Language. All of the skills outlined above for Year 10 will be returned to and students will work on improving their efforts from Year 10, and should by this point know their areas of strength and weakness.  They will work on evaluation skills and again, will be exposed to a range of high quality texts in order to improve their understanding of great Literature and great writing.  Students will sit a variety of mock exams, and at the end of Year 11 will complete two exam papers on the AQA syllabus.  Each exam paper is 2 hours long.

In Year 11 students will work on skills needed for AQA  Paper 2, and through their study of Literature, will be taught the necessary skills needed to answer this paper.  These skills include summarising, analysis, and comparison, and will also be needed when approaching English Literature.

Year 11 English Literature 

In Year 11, we will study An Inspector Calls and students will add to their literary knowledge by studying a variety of poems in detail. In lessons we will also begin to revise the texts that were studied in Year 10, and students will be expected to read these texts again at home. 

If you would like to prepare your child for GCSE English Language and Literature at APA, you could purchase the following texts:

 

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  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions (5 Dec. 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840224118

 

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  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (5 Mar. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198324006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198324003
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  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 42815 KB
  • Print Length: 100 pages
  • Publisher: CGP Books (4 Aug. 2015)

 

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  • Hardcover: 81 pages
  • Publisher: Heinemann (12 Jan. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0435232827
  • ISBN-13: 978-0435232825

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  • Paperback: 88 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (21 May 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198355300
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198355304

 

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  • Paperback: 72 pages
  • Publisher: Longman; 1 edition (2 July 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408248794
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408248799

 

KS5 A-Level English Literature

English Literature at A-Level is a two year linear course and students sit their exams at the end of Year 13. Students study a wide range of texts during the two years, including texts from writers of different cultures (American, Afro-American and Nigerian writers) as well as Renaissance drama, modern drama and dystopian fiction. We encourage students to become more independent and critical when reading and arrange a number of extra-curricular trips throughout the school year to support their studies. Year 12 students will visit the National Theatre Archive to enjoy a private screening of the original stage production of Bennett’s The History Boys.  Year 13 students, on the other hand, will be visiting the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse to watch The White Devil. In year 13, students are able to choose their own coursework texts whilst planning and drafting their 3000 word coursework folder.  This is to ensure that they have been able to pursue a highly personal route through their studies of literature as well as being made ready for the challenges of post-16 study.

We seek to promote British values and culture through our study of literary texts, which provides students with the opportunity to engage in topical issues and learn about different people, places and cultures through discussion and debate which promotes understanding and tolerance.

Level Unit Title Grade Weighting
A Level Component 01        

 

Exam unit

Drama and poetry pre-1900        
  • Shakespeare:  The Tempest
  • Drama and poetry pre-1900: Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi & Milton’s Paradise Lost books 9 &10
40% of total A level
  Component 02        

 

Exam unit

Comparative and contextual study: Dystopian writing        
  • Close reading in chosen topic area (unseen extracts)
  • Comparative and contextual study from chosen topic area - Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale/ George Orwell: Nineteen Eighty-Four as well as students own wider reading within dystopian genre
40% of total A level
  Component 03        

 

Coursework

unit

Literature post-1900: synoptic unit        

Learners are required to study three literary texts (one text for Task 1 ‘close reading task’ and two texts for Task 2 ‘comparative task)

 

  • Task 1: critical response to extract from The Color Purple Jerusalem by Jez Butterworth (2009) or The History Boys (2004), 1000 word limit

 

  • Task 2: an exploration of contrasts and comparisons of one post 2000 drama text and one post 1900 poetry text of students’ own choice
20% of total A level