Sixth Form Specific Subjects

Media Studies

Teaching British Values through Media Studies

Studying Media promotes British values through seeking to read media products through a critical lens by questioning who, how and what is being represented and who is constructing the representation.

Students are also encouraged to demonstrate their individual liberty through responding independently to coursework briefs and are actively encouraged to make choices, knowing that they are in a safe and supportive environment. 

We live in a media-saturated world. From video clips on your phone, to TV adverts to blockbuster movies, to billboards on the underground, to the music in your ears, you are surrounded by media messages for most of your waking hours. How do you make sense of them all? How do you know what they are trying to communicate — both on an obvious and a less obvious level? How do you know how much you have been influenced — consciously or subconsciously — by these media messages? Does the media reflect your reality, or control the way you view it?

KS5

In year 12, students will develop enquiry, critical thinking and decision-making skills through the study of media texts, audiences and institutions. Students will also learn how to use media key concepts in order to effectively analyse moving images from a variety of genres.

Students are able to enhance their enjoyment and appreciation of the media and its role in their daily lives. They will investigate media in order to understand and evaluate how meanings and responses are created across the media platforms, broadcast, e-media and print when producing an individual media portfolio as part of the coursework unit where they work independently to respond to a brief set by AQA.

In year 13, students are encouraged to demonstrate, develop and formulate their understanding of the media and its influential role in society as well as debating major contemporary media issues.

Students will respond to a brief set by AQA that focuses on representation; this work which promotes choice, enabling students to study areas of representation that engage and are relevant to them.

Sociology

Teaching British Values through Sociology

We promote British values through advocating and teaching democracy. Seeking to understand inequalities in the structures of society and demonstrating an acceptance of beliefs and cultural norms in our multi-cultural society

A Level

There is usually another way of looking at things – and that is the task of Sociology. Sociologists take normal every day, taken-for-granted life and turn it upside down, looking for other meanings. Sociology is the subject which studies the social world around us, how this social world operates and how it influences our daily lives.

Sociology is an evidence based subject; this means it is not just about the sociologist’s personal opinion – our opinions and theories must be backed up by facts about society. As well as producing theories about society, sociology has practical applications. For example, if you know the causes of social problems such as the causes of educational underachievement, we may be able to use this knowledge to design social policies to improve children’s educational opportunities.

Sociology will help enhance skills in research, evaluation and making informed judgements on emerging trends in society.

In year 12, sociology students study the changing patterns of Families; they will look at themes such as how attitudes towards the notion that childhood has changed and the reasons for the increasing diversity of family types today. Students will also study Education and examine how internal factors such as teacher labelling and peer groups can affect academic achievement. In addition, students learn the different approaches sociologists take when researching trends in society.

In year 13, students study trends in Mass Media, such as how influenced viewers of the media are, who decides what news is shown and how this is presented to audience. Alongside this, students will also study Crime and Deviance and evaluate how attitudes towards class, gender and ethnicity shape law making and prosecution rates. African-American men make up 60% of prison inmates in America. Is this because they are all criminals or because institutions such as the police have labelled them so?

Psychology

 Teaching of British Values through Psychology

We promote British values through advocating and teaching acceptance of all individuals regardless of their differences. We explore and promote the importance of equal rights for men and women and individuals suffering with mental health issues.  We seek to understand the differences within and between cultures and demonstrate an acceptance of the beliefs and cultural norms in our multi-cultural society.

A Level Psychology

Psychology is the study of human behaviour. It explores the motivations we have for our emotional responses, social interactions and everyday behaviours. Students considering studying psychology, social sciences or research based degrees at University should consider taking Psychology at A Level. Psychology will help you to enhance your skills in research, comparison, analysis and evaluation, whilst learning about the theories that underpin our everyday behaviours and motivations.

In Year 12 psychology students learn about the origins of psychology and how psychology became a science. In addition students learn about the different approaches psychologists take when studying human behaviour and the associated research methods. Students then go on to apply these ideas to psychopathology, memory, attachment and social influence.

Year 13 psychology builds upon the skills learnt in Year 12. Students discuss the issues, debates and approaches associated with psychological science. Students then go on to explore further topics in detail, including romantic relationships, aggression, gender, schizophrenia and media psychology.

Photography

Teaching British Values through Photography

The A level photography course expects students to respond to their local area, London and Britain. They start with trips and photoshoots that explore diverse areas of London (Shoreditch, Brick lane and the Wandle river) and are encouraged to use this first hand research to develop ideas further.

Through analysis, evaluation and the manipulation of imagery; the students develop an understanding of their own place in British society.

AS Photography

Exam board: EDEXCEL

There are four assessment objectives (25% for each) that the students need to adhere to. These are:

AO1: DEVELOP AO2: REFINE AO3: RECORD AO4: PRESENT

Unit 1: Coursework (50%)

The introduction to the coursework acts like a mini-foundation course. Students will study how a variety of artists and photographers respond to the world around them and will work on getting to know the cameras. They will be encouraged to respond in their own way and start to explore a personal theme. There will be a trip to galleries and several photoshoots around London. It is vital that students start to visit a variety of locations to further their personal work.

The photographs are then cropped and manipulated using Photoshop and the students present all of their workings as a Power Point. Although most of the work is digitalised photography, there is room for film and photographic collage.

The coursework unit finishes with an eight hour Mock Exam where students work to perfect their Power Points and final photographic pieces.

Unit 2: Externally set assignment (50%)

This exam paper will be given to students in the January of year 12. It is set by the exam board (Edexcel) and allows the student to prepare a work-journal of research leading to an eight hour examination in May.

The students need to use the experience gathered over the previous term of AS to help them develop ideas, explore materials, analyse, evaluate and work towards a final piece. They will then exhibit the work for internal marking and external verification by the exam board. As with the coursework, students will be judged on the four Assessment Objectives.

A2 Photography

Unit 3: Coursework (30%)

There are two components in this A2 unit; the Practical Work-Journal and the Personal Study. The Personal Study encourages the students to analyse and evaluate the work of artists and photographers in depth. For the practical journal they will be encouraged to respond in their own way and start to explore a personal theme. There will be a trip to London for a photo-shoot and to visit galleries.

Students can experiment with a variety of strategies and will be encouraged to take risks with their work and independently move forward. They should produce a Power Point of ideas, development, analysis and evaluation leading to the production of a final piece in a Mock Exam.

The coursework unit will be completed early in January.

Unit 4: Externally set assignment (20%)

This exam paper will be given to students in the January of year 13. It is set by the exam board (Edexcel) and allows the student to prepare a work-journal of research leading to the twelve hour practical examination in May.

The students need to use the experience gathered over the previous years of AS and A2 to help them develop ideas, explore materials, analyse, evaluate and work towards a final piece. They will then exhibit the work for internal marking and external verification by the exam board. As with the coursework, students will be judged on the four Assessment Objectives.