Chemistry

Chemistry, which is often referred to as the central science, is the study of the building blocks of life and how they interact with one another in chemical reactions. Chemistry touches every aspect of our lives from the bodily functions within us to the atmosphere around us. Through Chemistry we are able to explain biological and physical phenomena that cannot be understood through one science alone. The chemistry curriculum at Ark Putney Academy inspires curiosity by learning and applying in-depth knowledge of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry. Chemistry prepares you for a range of careers in the science and health sectors including medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, zoology, biomedicine, forensics, science teaching and biochemistry.

KS4 Chemistry (Year 10 & Year 11)

Content Assessment
GCSE chemistry has is split into 11 key sections: 

1. Atomic structure and the periodic table  
2. Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter  

3. Quantitative chemistry  
4. Chemical changes  
5. Energy changes  
6. The rate and extent of chemical change  
7. Organic chemistry  
8. Chemical analysis  
9. Chemistry of the atmosphere  
10. Using resources  
11. Key ideas  

Sections 1-5 are studied in year 10.  

Sections 6-11 are covered in year 11. 

GCSE chemistry is a linear qualification and in order to best prepare students for this we do multiple end of topics tests throughout the year. 

AQA External paper 1 assessment  

(Chapters 1-5) 

AQA External paper 2 assessment 

( Chapters 6-11)  

Autumn paper 1 – internal AQA past paper 

(Chapters 1-5) 

Spring paper 2 – internal AQA past paper 

(Chapters 6-11)

 

Year 12

Content   Assessment
3.1 Physical chemistry:  Physical chemistry focuses on mathematical and computational skills. 

The physical chemistry 

topics covered in year 12: 

3.1.1 Atomic structure 

3.1.2 Amount of substance 

3.1.3 Bonding 

3.1.4 Energetics 

3.1.5 Kinetics 

3.1.6 Chemical equilibria, Le Chatelier’s principle and Kc 

3.1.7 Oxidation, reduction and redox equations 

3.2 Inorganic chemistry is the study of the contents of the periodic table. Inorganic topics include: 

3.2.1 Periodicity 

3.2.2 Group 2, the alkaline earth metals 

3.2.3 Group 7(17), the halogens 

3.3 Organic chemistry is the study of carbon-based compounds. organic topics covered include: 

3.3.1 Introduction to organic chemistry 

3.3.2 Alkanes 

3.3.3 Halogenoalkane 

3.3.4 Alkenes 

3.3.5 Alcohols 

3.3.6 Organic analysis

January assessment- Topics from 3.1 physical chemistry:  

3.1.1 Atomic structure 

3.1.2 Amount of substance 

3.1.3 Bonding 

And 3.2 inorganic chemistry: 

3.2.1 Periodicity 

3.2.2 Group 2, the alkaline earth metals 

3.2.3 Group 7(17), the halogens 

June assessment- AS level exam paper internal but AQA past paper)  

Topics 3.1 physical chemistry, 3.2 inorganic chemistry and 3.3 organic chemistry. 

 

Year 13

Content    Assessment
3.1 Physical chemistry building on from the knowledge and application of the year 12 topics students will cover: 3.1.8 Thermodynamics  
3.1.9 Rate equations  
3.1.10 Equilibrium constant Kp for homogeneous systems 3.1.11 Electrode potentials and electrochemical cells 3.1.12 Acids and bases  

3.2 Inorganic chemistry building on from the knowledge and application of the year 12 topics students will cover: 

3.2.4 Properties of Period 3 elements and their oxides 3.2.5 Transition metals  
3.2.6 Reactions of ions in aqueous solution  

 

 

3.3 Organic chemistry building on from the knowledge and application of the year 12 topics students will cover: 

3.3.7 Optical isomerism  
3.3.8 Aldehydes and ketones 
3.3.9 Carboxylic acids and derivatives  
3.3.10 Aromatic chemistry  
3.3.11 Amines  
3.3.12 Polymers  
3.3.13 Amino acids, proteins and DNA  
3.3.14 Organic synthesis  
3.3.15 Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

3.3.16 Chromatography 

A level Chemistry qualification is also linear.     

AQA Chemistry (7404 & 7405) 

Paper 1: 3.2 Inorganic & 3.1 physical Chemistry 

Paper 2: 3.3 organic and 3.1 physical chemistry 

Paper 3: 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 Synoptic and practical enquiry